New to FaceBook Ads and overwhelmed? 5 key things you want to know (in plain English)

So you want to use FaceBook Ads to get more traffic to your site, build your newsletter list, invite people to your events and ultimately get more sales. But you are new to FaceBook Ads and you don’t know what you don’t know, and ultimately it could kill your conversions, confidence and your budget. It could stop you from creating an Ad campaign in the first place! Ack! We don’t want that now do we?

Here are 5 key things you want to know about FaceBook ads before you begin.

1. Plan first

Before you even log into your FaceBook Ads Manager there is some planning to do that will make it easier to create your ads and help you organize yourself.
Start by knowing your customer avatar. Who are they? What are their demographics, interests, who else do they follow on FaceBook and what organizations do they belong to?

What is the goal of your ad? Is it to increase awareness in your product or service? Is it to get more people to consider to work with you or buy your products, or is it to get more conversions (purchases of your product or service)?

2. Get your ad in front of the right audience

FaceBook ads are not magical unicorns!
FaceBook ads work when they are set up to target the right audiences, at the right time with the right offer. It’s easier than it sounds.

There three types of traffic: cold, warm and hot.
Cold traffic are people who have not heard of you and are not yet a lead.
Warm traffic are people who are a lead but have not bought from you.
Hot traffic are people who purchased from you and you want them to become a repeat customer.

You can create an ad for your new list builder (ie. a pdf download) and send that out to cold traffic. Since the offer is zero dollars, this is a great way to build your list.

You cannot however run an ad for your $10,000 coaching program or your $1,000 workshop and run that to cold traffic. Remember cold traffic are people who don’t know you. They don’t trust you because they don’t know you.

You could run the ad to those who have purchased from you previously (hot traffic) or have previously been to those offer pages (warm traffic), (see Pixels in #3 below).

Here are just a number of ways to find your audience on Facebook.
Target anyone who

  • has visited your site
  • has visited a specific page on your site
  • has visited a specific page on your site but did visit another page (ie. visited your sales page but didn’t visit your “thank you” page. In other words they didn’t buy)
  • hasn’t visited your site in a while
  • signed up for your freebie and now you want to sell them a product or service.

and you can also target:

  • People who like your page
  • Friends of people who like your page
  • People who responded to your event
  • People who didn’t responded to your event
  • Upload a list of email addresses of your leads/buyers and direct them to and offer (these are warm or hot leads).
  • People based on their interests
  • People based on their location
  • People who engage with your content on Facebook

And many more!

3. The Pixel is your friend

The FaceBook pixel is a piece of code that you add to your website. It enables FaceBook to keep stats on your site such as who visits it and which pages have been visited. This enables you to measure, optimize and build a targeted audience for your ads. This is cool because you can create an ad that appears only to those who went to your sales page about your retreat let’s say. These people are already considering coming to your retreat because they visited your page to learn more. These people are warm leads. So you can put out an ad that encourages them to come back to your offer page by offering them a discount or a special bonus, or warning them that a bonus offer is going to expire soon and won’t be available if they purchase at a later date.

The even cooler thing is that not only can you run an ad that specifically goes to people who went to a specific page on your site, like the retreat sales page, but you can exclude anyone who has purchased. So you are running this ad for people who looked but haven’t bought. You won’t be running the ad to people who have purchased it already. Pretty neat eh?

4. Keeping your ad consistent is key

The key to creating your ad graphic is to gear the look of it towards the page they will land on when they click your ad. Consistency is key. Branding is key. So you will want both your ad and your page to have the same colours, same fonts, same message and share the same image. Doing so will keep your “ad scent” fresh and keep those who click on your ad stick around. You won’t want to advertise “The best ways to get clients” and yet the page they are sent to has a picture of someone snowboarding and promotes a new diet drink, yes? It is enough to confuse the visitor and a confused mind always says no.

5. Leverage your ad

The “Ads Manager” allows you to create ads for FaceBook’s mobile News Feed, desktop News Feed & right column, Instagram and the Audience Network in one shot. When you are starting off I suggest only creating ads for the desktop News Feed. The image size for the desktop News Feed is the biggest out of all of the ads, so it provides you with the most space to get creative. Start simple and grow from there.

Introducing…


What if you could get more traffic to your site?
What if more people knew about you and your offers?
What if you had new people added to your newsletter list daily?
What if you could fill programs and events easily?
What if you could bring website visitors back to your sales page and buy the 2nd time around?

You can do all of the above with FaceBook ads, and in this new course I’m going to teach you what you need to know, especially if you have never created a FaceBook ad, and I’ll do it in plain English…no Geekese!

Registration closes this Friday. 25 spots have been sold and only 15 spots remain. Find out more and register here.


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