Listen up Big Corporations!

Dear Big Corporations,

I’m really concerned about the way you do business, or rather the way you are not doing business. This doesn’t apply to all businesses, I know. But it seems the businesses I deal with just don’t listen. Let me tell you a bit about my 30 minutes on the phone with a customer service rep.

This customer service rep interrupted me so many times, that I got tired of asking her to let me finish what I was saying. After a frustrating conversation with her, I asked to speak to her manager. It took 7 minutes for the manager to get on the phone and listen to my complaints. What do you think I did in that 7 minutes? I tweeted 3 times about my bad experience with said company. Finally the manager arrives and he interrupts me as well. When I called them out on it and asked him to review the recorded audio of my call with the customer service rep to see how rude she was, he said “Not all of our calls are recorded but I will be sure that the management team will review your comments”. I wasn’t convinced and I didn’t feel like I was being heard!

So I went back to Twitter, vented more about this bad customer service. If they didn’t reply to me at least I knew my Twitter friends were listening. I unfollowed them on both their twitter accounts only to read that the account I included in my tweets was is not being moderated by them. 🙁 The one tweet they posted read: “Follow us at @___ thanks!”

I give them points for being on Twitter, but I don’t give them points for knowing what to do with it!

If you are not using social media in your business you just aren’t listening to your customers, good or bad!

Lessons:

  1. Sign up for a Twitter account for your corporation.
  2. Hire someone or even a team to moderate your tweets. Do not just post tweets.
  3. Engage with your clients online!
  4. When an irritated client is waiting for a supervisor don’t keep them on hold long enough for them to tweet about their experience! Google is watching and so are your potential customers and clients.
  5. Don’t expect your clients to remember a tweet that says they should use your other twitter account to get your attention. We shouldn’t have to manage your Twitter accounts for you.

Last week I had the pleasure to work with @1sc on Twitter. I posted that I had a problem with a transaction that went through my online shopping cart but only posted as $1 on my merchant account. @1sc immediately replied to me and started to support me via twitter, email and even offered to be on a conference call with my merchant account to straighten the whole thing out. That gets a pass in my books! Way to go 1shoppingcart!

So which company do you want to be? The one who is using Twitter but doing the bare minimum, or the one who is using Twitter and keeping their current clients and attracting future clients?

Comments